Policies, Approaches and Collective Co-authorship Statement

Policies and approaches taken by the Landscapes of Injustice project
We acknowledge, with respect, the history, customs and culture of the Coast Salish and Straits Salish peoples on whose traditional lands the Landscapes of Injustice Project Office at the University of Victoria resides.
Hiring Practice Statement
In keeping with the objectives of our research, Landscapes of Injustice is committed to maximizing the diversity of our research collective. We encourage co-investigators to consider diversity in their hiring and employment practices, as we aim to build a research collective founded on inclusion and equity.
Research Material Policy
All research materials of Landscapes of Injustice will released to the public (subject to any ethical and legal considerations) at the conclusion of the research project, and, on a selective basis, some materials may be made available before that time. On the approval of the Project Director, materials may be publicly released for the use of: family members of Japanese Canadians whose experiences are recorded in the records (for example in Custodian case files, Bird Commission records, etc.); community groups undertaking initiatives that align with the goals of Landscapes of Injustice; publications (such as blog posts, poster exhibits, etc.) that include the display of primary sources; and others making suitable uses of the materials (to be considered on a case-by-case basis). We welcome inquiries about the use of our research materials for these purposes (please contact Project Director Jordan Stanger-Ross at jstross@uvic.ca for more information).
Terminology
Landscapes of Injustice is a community-engaged project, committed to working with Japanese Canadians, the people most affected by the dispossession, in the telling of this history. As part of the harms directed against Japanese Canadians in the 1940s, government officials and others developed euphemisms to obscure the real intent and impacts of their actions. These euphemisms have sometimes persisted in discussion of these events, perpetuating the wrongs of the policies themselves.Accordingly, we have worked with our Community Council to develop recommendations for the use of language within our project. While these recommendations are not intended to infringe upon academic freedom, they reflect the values of the project as a whole, as endorsed by the Executive and Steering Committees.
We recommend that the following terms be avoided:
“Evacuation” (and “Evacuees”) – used by government officials to describe the forced uprooting and internment of Japanese Canadians, it falsely implies that these processes protected Japanese Canadians.
“Japanese,” when referring to Japanese CanadiansCanadians of Japanese ancestry, or Nikkei, should not be confused with the country of Japan or its residents. At the time of their uprooting from the coastal area of British Columbia, 75% of Nikkei were Canadian-born or naturalized Canadians.
“Repatriation” – Sometimes used to refer to the exile of Japanese Canadians to Japan in 1946, this term falsely implies that the exiles originated in Japan. Our project is also committed to clarity of language with respect to the losses of property suffered by Japanese Canadians during the 1940s.
We therefore recommend the following terms:
Dispossession: referring to the range of processes that led to the loss of property, including theft, vandalism, neglect, and forced sales.
Forced sales: referring to the government policy of selling the property of Japanese Canadians without their consent.

We recommend the following resources on this topic: Roy Miki, Redress: Inside the Japanese Canadian Call for Justice (Vancouver: Raincoast Books, 2004), especially chapter 2. Roger Daniels, “Words do Matter: A note on Inappropriate Terminology and the Incarceration of Japanese Americans” in Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: Japanese Americans & Japanese Canadians in the Twentieth Century (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005).

Landscapes of Injustice
Collective Co-Authorship Statement

Landscapes of Injustice is a partnership project. Any published results of the project, including public presentations, reflect the collective work of many individuals as well as resources that emerged from collaboration. To acknowledge the centrality of collaboration in this project, publications and presentations by team members that make substantial use of project resources (benefitting from employee hours and project research materials) will normally include the Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective as a named co-author.*

We adopt this collective co-authorship convention, while acknowledging that the analysis and opinions expressed in any publication or presentation by a team member reflects his/her intellectual freedom. It cannot be vetoed or censored by any other member of the team, including the project executive. Published work and presentations represent the views and opinions of the named authors and not those of the project as a whole.*

*note: this policy does not include student theses completed in fulfillment of degree requirements. In this case, Landscapes of Injustice will not be named as a co-author, but should be explicitly acknowledged.

The Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective Includes

 

Aagesen, Sonja – Simon Fraser University

Adams, Eric – University of Alberta

Archibald, William – University of Victoria

Arneil, Stewart – University of Victoria

Bacaj-Gondia, Eglantina – Ryerson University

Beardsley, Richard – Richmond School District 38

Bets, Samantha – Simon Fraser University

Blomley, Nicholas – Simon Fraser University

Bridge, Kathryn – Royal BC Museum

Cartwright, Alissa – University of Victoria

Chalaturnyk, Lauren – University of Victoria

Clare, Jacqueline – University of Victoria

Etorma, Erl – Queen’s University

Findlay, Kaitlin – University of Victoria

Fitterer, Sarah – University of Victoria

Fitzgerald, Kyla – University of Victoria

Fong, Alicia – Ryerson University

Freund, Alexander – University of Winnipeg

Fujita, Elizabeth – Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre

Geiger, Andrea – Simon Fraser University

Gooding, Anna – University of British Columbia

Gray, Josephina – University of Victoria

Guthrie-Shimizu, Sayuri – OAH/JAAS Historians’ Collaborative Committee

Harris, Douglas – University of British Columbia

Hayes, Erin – Selkirk Montessori School

Hayes, Nathaniel – University of Victoria

Holmes, Martin – University of Victoria

Hur, Peter – Ryerson University

Hurworth, Kirsten – University of Victoria

Ishiguro, Laura – University of British Columbia

Ito, Momoko – Vancouver Japanese Language School & Japanese Hall

Kajiwara, Sherri – Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre

Kipp, Joyce – Surrey School District 36

Kluckner, Michael – Writer, artist

Kobayashi, Audrey – Queen’s University

Kostrich, Adam – University of Victoria

Kusaka, Elena – Ryerson University

Labove, Joshua – Simon Fraser University

Lansdowne, Helen – Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives, Uvic

Lutz, John – University of Victoria

Lyall, Gordon – University of Victoria

Madgin, Rebecca – University of Glasgow

Madokoro, Laura – McGill University

Masuda, Jeffrey – Queen’s University

McGarrity, Lane – University of Victoria

McLaren, John – University of Victoria

McLean, Hugh – City of Vancouver

Merriam, Ariel – University of Victoria

Miyanaga, Greg – Leigh Elementary School

Murakami, Susan – Ecole Simon Cunningham

Murray, Galen – University of Victoria

Nagata, Lorene – Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre

Okawa, Eiji – University of British Columbia

Orr, Kelly – Land Title and Survey Authority of BC

Owen, Brian – Simon Fraser University

Parhar, Manjot – University of Alberta

Pekic, Alexander – Ryerson University

Rachmat, Hikari – University of British Columbia

Read, Heather – Ryerson University

Reilly, Nolan – University of Winnipeg

Robinson, Greg – Université du Québec à Montréal

Rose-Redwood, Reuben – University of Victoria

Roy, Patricia – University of Victoria

Rzeplinski, Esther – Simon Fraser University

Sager, Eric – University of Victoria

Salas, Rebeca – Simon Fraser University

Schwinghamer, Steve – Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Stanger-Ross, Jordan – University of Victoria

Sugiman, Pamela – Ryerson University

Sugiman, Momoye – Ryerson University

Sugrue, Thomas – Urban History Association

Tam, Christopher – University of British Columbia

Tinsley, Mikayla – University of British Columbia

Ulysses, Monique – University of Victoria

Uyeda, Lisa – Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre

Weary, Rachel – University of Alberta

Walker, Jim – University of Waterloo

Whittingham, Mike – J. N. Burnett Secondary School

Wideman, Trevor – Simon Fraser University

Willmott, Rebecca – University of Victoria

Yakashiro, Nicole – University of Toronto

Yaremko, Erin – University of Winnipeg

Zucchi, John – McGill University